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Democratise the Cyberspace!

Democratise the Cyberspace!

‘Democratise the Cyberspace!’ is a personal reflection on the larger technological developments that fundamentally shape how we tell stories. It draws on discourses from media theory, art, activism, and media. I describe three phenomena that I identify as failures and errors, reflecting on how they influence storytelling. The first is the invisibilities of subjects and their lives that accompany these technological developments, which are reinforced along imperial and postcolonial axes. The second error is the public’s widespread digital illiteracy due to a lack of a broader discourse and the manifestation of micro-temporal processing in digital devices. The final error is the potential for distortion of realities through artificial intelligence and the overreliance on the accuracy of numbers. The essay ends with a suggestion of how cultural workers can face these shortcomings.

Experiential Literature?

Experiential Literature?

Using artificial intelligence (AI)-authored texts as a baseline for reading literary originals can help us discern what is new about today’s literature, rather than relying on the AI itself to embody that newness. GPT-3 is a language model that uses deep learning to produce human-like text. Its writing is (in)credible at first sight, but, like dreams, quickly becomes boring, nonsensical, or both. Engineers suggest this shortcoming indicates a complexity issue, but it also reveals an aspect of literary innovation: how stylistic tendencies are extended to disrupt normative reading habits in ways that are analogous to the disruptive experience our present and emergent reality. There is a dark irony to GPT-3’s inability to write coherently into the future: large language models are exploitative and wasteful technologies accessible only to multi-million-pound corporations. The commercial ambitions of the tool are evident in a curiously banal kind of writing, entirely symptomatic of the corporate-engineered sense of normalcy that obscures successive, irreversible crises as we sleep walk through the glitch era. Contrary to this, experimental literary practices can provoke critical-sensory engagement with the difficulties of our time. I propose that GPT-3 can be a measure of what effective literary difficulty is. I test this using two recent works, The Employees, a novel by Olga Ravn, and the ‘Septology’ series of novels by Jon Fosse. I contrast their ‘experiential literature’ with blankly convincing machine-authored versions of their work.

Beyond Individual Knowledge Creation

Beyond Individual Knowledge Creation

Abstract: Collective knowledge production and sharing are fundamental topics to critical discussions on education and creative practices. They often highlight issues of identity erasure and the lack of recognition of certain narratives due to imbalances in power structures. In this piece, projektado collective embarks on these discussions through the perspective of a group that adopts individual anonymity both as a statement and as a method. As a statement, it intends to incite reflections on the glorification of individual production and the hyper-focus on outcome in design practice, research and education. As a method, it allows us to explore collaborative and continuous work through the development of trust, companionship, responsibility and care. This spontaneously recorded conversation emphasises the need to critically approach the debate on identity in knowledge sharing while proposing free dialogue as a method of continual knowledge production.

What Happens in Performers’ Minds?

What Happens in Performers’ Minds?

This article aims to describe and understand what performers think about during performances and rehearsals while searching for a common language between music and dance. Departing from our own experiences as performers (a dancer and a musician), we ask the question what do we think about when we are dancing/playing? We assume that this awareness of what we think while performing is not obvious and decided to explore this by interviewing six dancers and six musicians about what we named performers’ ‘inner conversations.’ Within a phenomenological orientation, we developed a descriptive and interpretative study of a phenomenon (inner conversations) which gives itself to conscience, a pre-reflective consciousness. From the performers’ accounts, we extrapolated four trends: 1. Variation in awareness of inner conversations; 2. Altered states of awareness; 3. Parasitic inner conversations; and 4. Overcoming internal difficulties and external constraints through inner conversations. Looking at the dancers’ and musicians’ accounts together raised the question: How is the awareness of ‘inner conversations’ developed during performers’ initial education and training?

Exhaustion

Exhaustion

We have entered collective burnout. It feels as though we are exhausted by lurching from crisis to crisis: climate change, racial injustice, Covid-19, war and energy shortages. The readiness to find immediate solutions becomes worn out and we wonder if the system is broken. There seems to be no one-size-fits-all response.   But perhaps, instead of despair and looking for quick fixes, what if we reflected on the potential that could grow from this feeling of exhaustion? What becomes possible when slowing down the tendency to reach for ready-made old solutions that do not solve new problems? What happens if we don't act to fix things, but wait, refuse, and/or turn to something else? What happens when we move into the liminal space* of not knowing how to respond, when the in-betweenness of things is stretched so it can be embodied? What happens when we listen to our exhausted bodies, when we enter the thresholds of unconscious processes as resting, sleeping, grieving, waiting. Do we find creative opportunities there?   We acknowledge that the opportunity to not act is a privilege in and of itself. We are not condoning inaction in the face of injustice. Instead, we are looking for new answers and new ways of approaching the future. For example, artist and theologian Tricia Hersey, author of Rest Is Resistance: A Manifesto (forthcoming 2022) [footnote 1]http://www.triciahersey.com/[/footnote], draws on Black liberation and womanism to reframe napping or rest as a form of political resistance to grind and hustle culture.  

On JOY

On JOY

The act of learning is a privilege and as our minds get filled with more knowledge, we should also acknowledge that expanding the mind can (and should be) a joyous experience. Part thoughts, part poetry, part survival guide, part photographic images, ‘On JOY’ will be a series of notes and thoughts on how to find joy while studying inside an academic programme. These range from practical advice like chiselling out time in a schedule for a beverage with a friend to more abstract notes on losing yourself in thoughts while cycling.

Moving Through Time

Moving Through Time

This article investigates Pauline Oliveros’ Deep Listening exercise the Extreme Slow Walk as a mode of philosophical action or realisation of embodied knowledge. It develops a non-dualistic understanding of subjectivity by reconsidering relations between thinking and movement, and between thinker (or subject) and time as expressed in conventional notions such as ‘method,’ ‘experience,’ and ‘homeostasis.’ In contrast with conceptions of time that operate independently of perception as a regular and measurable ground for subjective experience, temporality is elaborated as a form of movement that is neither separate from nor purely internal to individual perception. In this paradigm, temporal movement is, like walking, simultaneously horizontal—forward and backward—and vertical, with a sense of depth and height involving actions of memory and anticipation. Oliveros’ exercise is introduced through her collaboration with Elaine Summers—dancer, choreographer, and pioneer of Kinetic Awareness—and the connections her work makes with Elsa Gindler’s pioneering work in psychophysical concentration; and brings this into dialogue with the implications of John Cage’s experimental music and concern for time. Deep Listening is then proposed as a musical discipline for the production of temporal awareness constitutive of subjectivity.

Sensory Knowledge for Changing Landscapes

Sensory Knowledge for Changing Landscapes

As climate change swiftly alters landscapes at unprecedented speeds, our cultural amnesia about past ecological states will become more acute. In this essay, I propose material encounters and embodied experiences with food and recipes as critical ways of ‘knowing’ changing landscapes in the Anthropocene. I suggest food-based methods for building alternative forms of knowledge about our changing climate, and I outline how a renewed environmental consciousness in the age of climate collapse can be enhanced from the creation of non-discursive knowledge based in recipes.

Listening to Bodies of Water

Listening to Bodies of Water

This paper is a plea for acknowledging the pluriverse through the act of listening. I use the Rhine river as an example. I live beside the Rhine, which is currently one of the most polluted rivers in the world. Contemporary water crises such as this one and poor water management are both caused and implemented by the One-World World—that is, the Euro-modern world with its single set of world-making practices. Using Astrida Neimanis’ onto-logic framework of amniotics, I explore the connections between bodies of water through my own body of water/while being a body of water myself. I then suggest listening as a technique to embody the hydrocommons. I argue that listening is a way of knowing, which can enable us to make kin with the river and allows us access to the polyphonies of the river.

Future Justice

Future Justice

Future Justice is a programme that invites young artists, researchers and educators to help unpack the idea of a future that is based on justice. Out of deep concern for the world, which is marked by a climate crisis as well as a social and political crisis, ArtEZ studium generale commissioned the publication series Future Justice. It is a series of publications in which students and alumni of ArtEZ present their visions of the future. Future Justice aims at unfolding alternative ideas of justice, which are informed by ideas of collectivity, care, restoration, non-violence and compassion. In doing so, the series takes a kaleidoscopic, hopeful and meaningful look at the future.

How Is Affect Related to the Social?

How Is Affect Related to the Social?

This essay will describe the analytical frameworks that affect studies has propagated that will be especially helpful for the scholar/artist invested in social justice issues to learn about as they critically think and create. Given that affect theory and the study of emotions are vast fields, full of competing and conflicting ideas, I have narrowed down my discussion to the contribution of feminist and queer (of colour) scholarship. This body of thought addresses affect in light of racial injustice, class and gender inequalities, climate justice, the rights of migrants and refugees, the discrimination of LGBTQ+ people, ageism and ableism. These pressing challenges of the twenty-first century are at the foreground of contemporary literature and art that seeks to effectuate a cultural intervention, and are therefore issues emphasised within the curriculums of art academies and humanities programmes. Guiding my essay is the question: How is affect related to the social?

Feminist Internet Research Is Messy

Feminist Internet Research Is Messy

Abstract: Feminist internet research is messy and conducting meta-research on feminist internet research is even messier. This is a critically reflective article on the author’s experience conducting a meta-research project on the feminist internet research methodologies and ethical frameworks of the eight Feminist Internet Research Network (FIRN) research projects. The piece argues that the messiness of research is not something to shy away from but rather to embrace.

Art, Design and Architectural Practices Beyond Precarious Working and Living Conditions

Art, Design and Architectural Practices Beyond Precarious Working and Living Conditions

Precarious working and living conditions are daunting, but they can be a launch pad for creating worlds that are socially and ecologically just. Artists, designers and architects can turn their skills towards creating economies, support structures and modes of life that can move themselves and others beyond precarity. To do so, this essay invites them to draw on feminist and posthumanist approaches to the world as points of orientation and inspiration for individual and collective action.

Can Translation Do Justice?

Can Translation Do Justice?

This contribution addresses the question of translation in art and art education. Every artist and teacher concerned with social and planetary justice, no matter what genre or art form, must find a mode of ‘translating’ the lives of those at the margins of society into a story, a performance, a piece of music, an artful encounter. Used in this sense, translation is never only or simply a matter of finding the right equivalences. That search for equivalences between life forms and lived realities that are radically different from each other is itself far from simple or a neutral process. Who is entitled to ‘translate’ others, to represent their voices and viewpoints and on what terms? What makes a good translator? Good intentions are not enough; in fact, they can often do more harm than good. Translation is as much a deeply artistic as well as a deeply political issue. This contribution offers reflections on the work of translation as a core task of the artist and art educator. Keywords: artists as translators, asymmetrical relations, necessary misapplication, repair

Critical Tactics in Participatory Art

Critical Tactics in Participatory Art

Participatory art (also called socially engaged art or community-based art) uses artistic tactics to work towards the creation of participation within a community. As a theatre practitioner and researcher, I have worked with prison theatre projects, both in prison and especially outside with formally incarcerated people on probation and/or in post-release. This experience made me question the critical role that we—artists, artist educators, and workshop facilitators—play when embarking on these journeys. How do we position ourselves in the group work? How does the dynamic between us and them function? Does this binary division actually exist? And how do we evaluate our work in terms of benefits for the specific group of people we engage with? By reflecting on my personal artistic and research experience in Italy, I highlight some criticalities of participatory art and suggest some practice-based reflections on the possibility of contributing to building empowering tools through the use of critical tactics. Critical because they incorporate the needs and specificities of the accompanying artistic tasks; yet, at the same time, daring to question and problematise the very field in which they operate. In doing so, critical tactics can represent a radical perspective on participatory art, fostering the encompassing of theories, reflections, and experiences that do not come directly from the field of art but can enrich it nonetheless. I refer to these tactics as the three A’s: accessibility, to look into how we can make participatory art projects accessible and open to everyone; agency, to highlight the need for ownership from the participants’ point-of-view; and articulation, to insist on the need for co-creation to avoid falling into the trap of representation. Keywords: Participatory art; critical tactics; artist educator; prison theatre; accessibility; agency; articulation.

Representing the Self, Improperly

Representing the Self, Improperly

This text traces the multi-faceted meanings of the Šejla Kamerić’s artwork Bosnian Girl by asking how a stereotype can be taken up and turned on itself. I explain how Orientalism and Balkanism are ideological discourses that are coded into the work’s original graffiti text. I subsequently demonstrate how the piece performs an intervention into these dominant meanings by showing how trans-coding, mimesis, embodiment and the strategy of ‘the eternal return’ is used to disavow the charged meaning in the original message. Keywords: representation, mimesis, feminist art, Orientalism, Balkanism, cultural studies

Vulnerable Looking

Vulnerable Looking

This essay attempts to consider more responsive and responsible forms of perception, which help reflect on artworks and ourselves through the shared experience of embodied vulnerability. I argue that transforming one’s practice of looking by engaging in disability art and vulnerability will be a potentially radical tool in one’s art-making practices and in what such art-making can provoke. Technological and media developments in the use of artistic tools have reordered our relationship between visual perception and spatial and bodily experience. By introducing ‘tools’ such as vulnerability and disability aesthetics to our art making and visual practices, we will allow ourselves to reorder more critically the artistic impact on the meaning-making of ‘disability’ and other forms of culturally excluded forms of diverse and variant embodiment. keywords; visual thinking, vulnerability, disability aesthetics, art-making, embodied reflection, ableism, variation vs deviance, unlearning artistic and visual practices

Subversive Affirmation

Subversive Affirmation

This essay looks into critical mimesis as an artistic strategy, discussing how artists imitate or copy non-theatre systems or formats while subtly subverting them, thus critiquing these existing systems and ideologies ‘from within.’ After providing a brief example—Julian Hetzel’s Schuldfabrik—the essay further introduces the concept of subversive affirmation and the closely related notion of over-identification, referring to scholars Inke Arns and Sylvia Sasse, Slavoj Žižek and the BAVO research collective. The concept of subversive affirmation is then used to analyse the large-scale project Unified Estonia by Theatre NO99 (2010), in which the Estonian theatre company created a fictious political party to investigate the performance of populist politics. Zooming in on (moral) ambiguity and ethical dilemmas as key characteristics of the strategy, the essay closes with a brief discussion of Samira Elagoz’s solo Cock, Cock … Who’s There? (2016), in which she cleverly plays with the logics of online dating platforms in order to re-appropriate the male gaze. keywords; camouflage acts, imitation as critical practice, mimesis, over-identification, performance and politics, subversive affirmation

Online onderwijs

Online onderwijs

Wereldsterren spreken zich via sociale media in toenemende mate uit over maatschappelijke onderwerpen. Deze vorm van para-sociale ‘massa-educatie’ blijkt verrassend democratisch. In dit essay wordt uiteengezet op welke manier celebrity-educators Miley Cyrus en Cardi B nieuwe, digitale vormen van politiek engagement inzetten om hun volgers uit te nodigen zich te ontwikkelen tot kritische, mediawijze burgers. Er wordt beargumenteerd dat we de angst voor de passieve, naïeve en beïnvloedbare jonge internetgebruiker achter ons dienen te laten; de volger heeft immers toegang tot een wereld aan informatie en kan daarmee naar eigen wens ook deelnemer dan wel educator worden.

Stories from the Rainforest: Nature intended it that way 1

Stories from the Rainforest: Nature intended it that way 1

As a part of ArtEZ studium generale research on Land: on climate, ownership and coexistence, Lonnie van Brummelen and Siebren de Haan’s contribution offers a rich reflection on how materials speak to them in and through their artistic practice. By tracing material flows and goods within the global economy, they show the rifts and new relations between human and their environment. Nature intended it that way is the second essay in the series Stories from Rainforest.

Stories from the Rainforest: Plantationocene

Stories from the Rainforest: Plantationocene

As a part of ArtEZ studium generale research on Land: on climate, ownership and coexistence, Lonnie van Brummelen and Siebren de Haan’s contribution offers a rich reflection on how materials speak to them in and through their artistic practice. By tracing material flows and goods within the global economy, they show the rifts and new relations between human and their environment. Plantationocene is the first essay in the series Stories from Rainforest.

Stories from the Rainforest: Introduction

Stories from the Rainforest: Introduction

As a part of ArtEZ studium generale research on Land: on climate, ownership and coexistence, Lonnie van Brummelen and Siebren de Haan’s contribution offers a rich reflection on how materials speak to them in and through their artistic practice. By tracing material flows and goods within the global economy, they show the rifts and new relations between human and their environment. Their contribution will be published between January and June 2021. This text serves as an introduction to their series Stories from Rainforest.

Disconnected

Disconnected

In the song ‘Disconnected,’ Paola Carosso and Wolkenman use a bi-linguistic songwriting process to explore and voice their perspective on places to call home in our current social political climate. Paola sings in Arabic and takes the perspective of the person looking through the fence to the other side, where Europe waits, so close but yet so far away. Speaking in Dutch, Wolkenman can choose: shout and get frustrated or close his eyes and deny even seeing the fence.

What Is Urgent Publishing?

What Is Urgent Publishing?

Publishing is increasingly being challenged through instantaneous social media publishing, even in the fields of scholarship and cultural, philosophical and political debate. Memetic self-publishers, such as the right-wing ‘YouTube intellectual’ Jordan Peterson and his left-wing counterpart Natalie Wynn, seem to tap into urgent needs that traditional publishing fails to identify and address. Does their practice amount to a new form of urgent publishing? How is it different from non-urgent publishing on the one hand and from propaganda on the other? Which urgencies can be addressed by urgent publishing? What is the role of artists and designers in it?

Listening to Oikos

Listening to Oikos

This contribution discusses how a sense of home is established through the sounds we hear and make, day after day. Relationships are drawn between the Covid-19 semi-lockdowns and regulations, the work of Soundtrackcity, and the work of sound artist Elise ’t Hart. This is followed by a listen—as told during an online meeting of Walk Listen Create—into the process of developing the idea for this do-it-yourself home listening guide. The piece concludes with statements made by the individual contributors in response to the question of how listening might contribute to a (unique) relationship to home.

Redefining Oikos. Where Do We Feel at Home?

Redefining Oikos. Where Do We Feel at Home?

In issuing this Open Call, APRIA wanted contributors to reflect on questions such as: ‘What or who determines what home is?’ and ‘What does it mean to be at home?’ Seven contributions from ArtEZ students and staff were selected, a variety of artistic research in form and content. The researchers delve into the complex meaning of oikos, re-examining concepts of home and the tension between safe and harmful spaces in times of crisis.

Just Leaving and Other Ways of Saying Goodbye

Just Leaving and Other Ways of Saying Goodbye

This series of articles has covered engagement. But what about disengagement? In other words, once a commitment has been made and a practice has been conducted, how does an artist ‘quit’ it? This article looks at some key considerations that make moral evaluation of engaged practices possible. In thinking through these evaluations, we come across a set of methods of disengagement that rethink the relation engaged practices have to ethical judgement.

From ‘Collective Anonymity’ to ‘Individual Mark’

From ‘Collective Anonymity’ to ‘Individual Mark’

The question of artistic or arts-based education, learning, and training has all too often only been posed and concerned with the performance of institutions inherited from the colonial period, as if ancient African societies were foreign to it. This undoubtedly justifies a certain disconnection between the current art system and the public to a point where the idea of art as an activity strictly practiced by white people has increasingly become attached to its social life.

Othering Time

Othering Time

In her article “Othering Time: Strategies of Attunement to Non-Human Temporalities”, Alice Smits delves into artistic practices that tune into deep time and non-human time zones. Starting from the view point that our current ecological crisis is in need of developing an ethics of care towards generations far into the future and life forms extremely different to ours, she discusses art and aesthetic knowledge as particularly well suited for experimentation with new stories and sensibilities about our place in time.

A Call to Recognize and to Imagine

A Call to Recognize and to Imagine

Discussing the way petrocapitalism frames current issues like air pollution and the Fukushima disaster, this text highlights the art of recognizing the state of the earth. Together with the arts (primarily literature, as Ghosh also suggests), the aim of this text is then to place a greater emphasis on imagining the earth otherwise, or, recognizing a different earth. This way we do not so much critique modernity, or the petrocapitalist forms of science, but rather, affirmatively, search for an alternative, a more inclusive and less human-centered way to deal with the crises of the contemporary.

Soundings of Ecological Time in Contemporary Music and Sound Art

Soundings of Ecological Time in Contemporary Music and Sound Art

This essay aims to find ways in which, through music and sound art, we may be able to attune to temporalities that are less anthropocentric and more ecologically minded. In this investigative essay Christenhusz will take a closer listen to four works that touch upon this theme of more-than-human time: Jennifer Walshe’s Time Time Time (2019), Jem Finer’s Longplayer (1999), Felix Hess’ Air Pressure Fluctuations (2001) and John Luther Adams’s The Place Where You Go to Listen (2004-2006). Christenhusz aims to enquire how these works offer representations and sonifications of ecological notions of time through sound.

Hoe is het eigenlijk om mens te zijn?

Hoe is het eigenlijk om mens te zijn?

Wat heeft de kunsteducator van de toekomst nodig om zowel binnen- als buitenschools sociaal geëngageerd te werken? Ons eigen perspectief blijkt een werkelijke verbinding met de ander vaak in de weg te zitten. In dit artikel wordt verslag gedaan van de zoektocht die kunstvakdocentopleidingen in 2019 gezamenlijk ondernamen om te ontdekken wat we in dit opzicht van de kunsteducator mogen verwachten en wat het instituut en de opleidingen daarvoor nodig hebben in hun houding, kennis en vaardigheden.

What is it actually like to be human?

What is it actually like to be human?

What does art education need to enable future educators to work in a socially engaged practice, both in and outside school? Our own perspective often appears to hinder a real connection with the other. This article reports on the quest that art teacher training programmes embarked on jointly in 2019 to discover what we can expect from the artist educator in this respect and what the institute and the programmes need in terms of attitude, knowledge and skills.

Er woont iemand in het moeras

Er woont iemand in het moeras

Lietje Bauwens schrijft in haar essay over het moeras. Het moeras wordt vaak geromantiseerd als uitgestorven natuurfenomeen. In het licht van historische droogleggingpraktijken in Amerika, plaatst Lietje Bauwens hier kritische vraagtekens bij. Ze grijpt daarentegen (de metafoor van) het moeras aan voor een kritische blik op onderdrukkingsmechanismen in steden als Brussel en Amsterdam, die tenslotte gebouwd zijn op moeras. Aan de hand van verschillende artistieke projecten over het moeras, analyseert Lietje hoe drassige bodemgronden nog altijd doorleven in onze sociale realiteit.

Fervent Pharmakon

This article demonstrates how both food and fashion are closely tied to emotions and to our biosocial beings, offering ‘sweet tastes of aesthetics and sensory pleasure.’ von Busch argues how quick consumption—in these industries of fast and mass production—has paradoxically led to unhealthy addictions (to food and/or social affirmation and self-esteem) and to hunger and emotional starvation. Cooking together or making clothes collectively could, as von Busch suggests, form more intimate and social bonds, as well as healthier relationships with food and fashion.

Taste: The Lost Sense, or Why the Culinary Arts Should Integrate with Art Education

Taste: The Lost Sense, or Why the Culinary Arts Should Integrate with Art Education

This conversation inquires why the culinary arts—representing the sense of taste in relation to food—have hardly found ground in art education. The optical, the audible, the touchable and moveable have found fertile ground in all kinds of art disciplines, whereas the sense of taste and tasting, historically connected to the aesthetic judgment of artistic objects par excellence, has hardly found refuge for its proper object, i.e., food.

Post Luxury:

Post Luxury:

This article employs the timing of post peak normcore to investigate a trend that surely entailed more than meets the eye. Described as “a unisex fashion trend characterized by unpretentious, normal-looking clothing” by Wikipedia, normcore was in fact not meant to be a trend at all, nor was it meant to be used to refer to a particular code of dress. Initially a spoof marketing term coined by the art collective/trend forecasting group K-Hole in 2013, normcore was originally a subversive concept, anticipating an alternative way forward, proposing anti-distinction as the radical new, analysed here as a mode beyond luxury—as ‘post luxury’. Combining anthropology, consumption theory, and critical fashion theory with a practice-based insight informed by the author’s background in trend analysis and brand planning as well as the art school context, this article attempts to frame and unpack normcore in order to speculate about the future of luxury.

Luxurizing Pre-loved Clothes:

Luxurizing Pre-loved Clothes:

Pre-loved clothes have much to offer the consumer as a future form of luxury, not in the least because of their sustainability. However, despite their quality and exclusivity, not all pre-loved clothes are believed to offer consumers the luxury value vintage clothes do. Can pre-loved clothes become a luxury, and if so, how? This raises questions about how luxury fashion comes into being and about the stakes of human versus material agency in processes of the ‘luxurization’ of fashion.

The Fashion of Relations

The Fashion of Relations

For several years now, academic programmes in Fashion Studies have offered an increasingly diverse variety of teachings on the most abstract and conceptual aspects of fashion. There are courses that dissect its imaginary, analyse its iconography, study the psycho-sociology or semiotics of clothing, or explore the emerging practice of fashion curating to explore the controversial subject of the cultural and industrial death of fashion itself. As though the mere materiality of the garment were no longer a concern for fashion intellectuals today, more and more publications in this field appear to reflect this shift.