Articles by: Emilie Baltz

Through her work, Emilie Baltz uses food and the senses to create new experiences that foster wonder, curiosity and delight. She is an award-winning author and public speaker with appearances at TEDx, DLD, PSFK Conference, Ignite Conference, Creative Mornings, The Today Show, NBC, Wall Street Journal, D-Crit and more. Baltz is based in New York City and works out of the New Lab for emerging technologies. She is a founding member of NEW INC, the first museum-led incubator hosted at the New Museum and is also part of the founding faculty of the School of Visual Arts Products of Design MFA programme, as well as the founder of the Food Design Studio at Pratt Institute. Baltz is the author of the award-winning L.O.V.E FOODBOOK, recipient of Best First Cookbook in the World at the Prix Gourmand held annually in the Louvre, Paris, and the nationally featured cookbook, Junk Foodie: 51 Delicious Recipes for the Lowbrow Gourmand. She lectures and consults internationally on the transformative power of sensory experience in the lives of creators and consumers.

Redefining Oikos. Where Do We Feel at Home?

Redefining Oikos. Where Do We Feel at Home?

In issuing this Open Call, APRIA wanted contributors to reflect on questions such as: ‘What or who determines what home is?’ and ‘What does it mean to be at home?’ Seven contributions from ArtEZ students and staff were selected, a variety of artistic research in form and content. The researchers delve into the complex meaning of oikos, re-examining concepts of home and the tension between safe and harmful spaces in times of crisis.

Just Leaving and Other Ways of Saying Goodbye

Just Leaving and Other Ways of Saying Goodbye

This series of articles has covered engagement. But what about disengagement? In other words, once a commitment has been made and a practice has been conducted, how does an artist ‘quit’ it? This article looks at some key considerations that make moral evaluation of engaged practices possible. In thinking through these evaluations, we come across a set of methods of disengagement that rethink the relation engaged practices have to ethical judgement.