Articles by: Melle Foortjes

Melle Foortjes (1998, Almelo) is a Dutch designer. Her work moves, following the interaction between thought, physical investigation, artistic intuition and dynamic reflection, captured in images, materials and interrelational propositions so they can carry and share their story. She is currently preparing her final graduation work for the Crossmedia Design programme at the AKI ArtEZ University of the Arts in Enschede, which is entitled Fluid Syntaxis on non-human language and the memory of water. Growing up in the calm east of the country gave her the opportunity to explore her receptive senses, giving her a fascination for detail, scale, continuous interaction, and process. She explores the paces and rhythms of her surroundings, searching for the relations between herself, others, things and their milieu. Reflecting and stimulating processes in which these elements organically influence each other, merge, transform and therefore always change into new qualities that allow new connections to be made.

Redefining Oikos. Where Do We Feel at Home?

Redefining Oikos. Where Do We Feel at Home?

In issuing this Open Call, APRIA wanted contributors to reflect on questions such as: ‘What or who determines what home is?’ and ‘What does it mean to be at home?’ Seven contributions from ArtEZ students and staff were selected, a variety of artistic research in form and content. The researchers delve into the complex meaning of oikos, re-examining concepts of home and the tension between safe and harmful spaces in times of crisis.

Just Leaving and Other Ways of Saying Goodbye

Just Leaving and Other Ways of Saying Goodbye

This series of articles has covered engagement. But what about disengagement? In other words, once a commitment has been made and a practice has been conducted, how does an artist ‘quit’ it? This article looks at some key considerations that make moral evaluation of engaged practices possible. In thinking through these evaluations, we come across a set of methods of disengagement that rethink the relation engaged practices have to ethical judgement.