Articles by: Terike Haapoja

Terike Haapoja is a visual artist based in New York. Haapoja’s large scale installation work, writing and political projects investigate the mechanics of othering with a specific focus on issues arising from the anthropocentric worldview of Western modernism. The question of animality and the possibility of a community of difference are recurring themes in Haapoja's work. Haapoja represented Finland in the 55th Venice Biennale with a solo show in the Nordic Pavilion, and her work has been awarded with the ANTI prize for Live Art (2016), the Dukaatti prize (2008), an Ars Fennica prize nomination, a Finnish State Media art award (2016) and the Kiila prize (2013). Haapoja’s work has been exhibited widely in solo and group shows internationally, including the Taipei Biennale, the Momentum Biennale, the Museum of Modern Art in China, Chronus Art Center Shanghai, ISCP New York, House of Electronic Arts Basel and ZKM, Germany. Terike Haapoja is an adjunct professor at NYU, New York. 

Redefining Oikos. Where Do We Feel at Home?

Redefining Oikos. Where Do We Feel at Home?

In issuing this Open Call, APRIA wanted contributors to reflect on questions such as: ‘What or who determines what home is?’ and ‘What does it mean to be at home?’ Seven contributions from ArtEZ students and staff were selected, a variety of artistic research in form and content. The researchers delve into the complex meaning of oikos, re-examining concepts of home and the tension between safe and harmful spaces in times of crisis.

Just Leaving and Other Ways of Saying Goodbye

Just Leaving and Other Ways of Saying Goodbye

This series of articles has covered engagement. But what about disengagement? In other words, once a commitment has been made and a practice has been conducted, how does an artist ‘quit’ it? This article looks at some key considerations that make moral evaluation of engaged practices possible. In thinking through these evaluations, we come across a set of methods of disengagement that rethink the relation engaged practices have to ethical judgement.