Results tagged by Deep listening

Moving Through Time

Moving Through Time

This article investigates Pauline Oliveros’ Deep Listening exercise the Extreme Slow Walk as a mode of philosophical action or realisation of embodied knowledge. It develops a non-dualistic understanding of subjectivity by reconsidering relations between thinking and movement, and between thinker (or subject) and time as expressed in conventional notions such as ‘method,’ ‘experience,’ and ‘homeostasis.’ In contrast with conceptions of time that operate independently of perception as a regular and measurable ground for subjective experience, temporality is elaborated as a form of movement that is neither separate from nor purely internal to individual perception. In this paradigm, temporal movement is, like walking, simultaneously horizontal—forward and backward—and vertical, with a sense of depth and height involving actions of memory and anticipation. Oliveros’ exercise is introduced through her collaboration with Elaine Summers—dancer, choreographer, and pioneer of Kinetic Awareness—and the connections her work makes with Elsa Gindler’s pioneering work in psychophysical concentration; and brings this into dialogue with the implications of John Cage’s experimental music and concern for time. Deep Listening is then proposed as a musical discipline for the production of temporal awareness constitutive of subjectivity.

Listening to Bodies of Water

Listening to Bodies of Water

This paper is a plea for acknowledging the pluriverse through the act of listening. I use the Rhine river as an example. I live beside the Rhine, which is currently one of the most polluted rivers in the world. Contemporary water crises such as this one and poor water management are both caused and implemented by the One-World World—that is, the Euro-modern world with its single set of world-making practices. Using Astrida Neimanis’ onto-logic framework of amniotics, I explore the connections between bodies of water through my own body of water/while being a body of water myself. I then suggest listening as a technique to embody the hydrocommons. I argue that listening is a way of knowing, which can enable us to make kin with the river and allows us access to the polyphonies of the river.