Results tagged by Fashion

Fervent Pharmakon

This article demonstrates how both food and fashion are closely tied to emotions and to our biosocial beings, offering ‘sweet tastes of aesthetics and sensory pleasure.’ von Busch argues how quick consumption—in these industries of fast and mass production—has paradoxically led to unhealthy addictions (to food and/or social affirmation and self-esteem) and to hunger and emotional starvation. Cooking together or making clothes collectively could, as von Busch suggests, form more intimate and social bonds, as well as healthier relationships with food and fashion.

Post Luxury:

Post Luxury:

This article employs the timing of post peak normcore to investigate a trend that surely entailed more than meets the eye. Described as “a unisex fashion trend characterized by unpretentious, normal-looking clothing” by Wikipedia, normcore was in fact not meant to be a trend at all, nor was it meant to be used to refer to a particular code of dress. Initially a spoof marketing term coined by the art collective/trend forecasting group K-Hole in 2013, normcore was originally a subversive concept, anticipating an alternative way forward, proposing anti-distinction as the radical new, analysed here as a mode beyond luxury—as ‘post luxury’. Combining anthropology, consumption theory, and critical fashion theory with a practice-based insight informed by the author’s background in trend analysis and brand planning as well as the art school context, this article attempts to frame and unpack normcore in order to speculate about the future of luxury.

RES MATERIA

RES MATERIA

Res Materia is an artistic research project by fashion designer Sanne Karssenberg that proposes a personalized form of the reproduction of garments and an alternative form of value creation. The title Res Materia is inspired by the Latin phrase Res Publica, meaning ‘public affairs’ or ‘commonwealth’. Res is a Latin noun for a substance or a concrete thing. ‘Materia’ is Latin for material. In this project, the material and the thing, or in this case, the textile and the garment, are the starting point for an embodied reproduction of garments—an attempt to bring change into ‘public affairs’.

The Fashion of Relations

The Fashion of Relations

For several years now, academic programmes in Fashion Studies have offered an increasingly diverse variety of teachings on the most abstract and conceptual aspects of fashion. There are courses that dissect its imaginary, analyse its iconography, study the psycho-sociology or semiotics of clothing, or explore the emerging practice of fashion curating to explore the controversial subject of the cultural and industrial death of fashion itself. As though the mere materiality of the garment were no longer a concern for fashion intellectuals today, more and more publications in this field appear to reflect this shift.