Results tagged by Time

REREREreREREreREREREREREParasite

REREREreREREreREREREREREParasite

This publication is the record of an associative dialogue between Semâ Bekirović and Saskia Isabella Maria Korsten about the outbreak of SARS-CoV-19. The focus of their conversation became the experience of time during the COVID-19 pandemic. Along the way, some lines of thought were deleted or relocated, and others were developed further; some theoretical notions were also added to the document. With every new version, one more ‘RE’ was added to the title of the document. Using code, Korsten transformed the dialogue into a COVID-19 clock, based on parameters gathered from the variables of the pandemic.

Ecological Time

Ecological Time

The term ‘Anthropocene’ brings together a range of interrelated ecological catastrophes and relates human history to the time scales of the earth. While dominant modes of thinking maintain technocratic notions of nature and time, art has (re)presented alternative proposals and practices that radically shift perception. To foreground and strengthen the power of art to challenge core cultural assumptions and motivate change, this text maps out the implications of philosophical positions often referred to by artists.

Soundings of Ecological Time in Contemporary Music and Sound Art

Soundings of Ecological Time in Contemporary Music and Sound Art

This essay aims to find ways in which, through music and sound art, we may be able to attune to temporalities that are less anthropocentric and more ecologically minded. In this investigative essay Christenhusz will take a closer listen to four works that touch upon this theme of more-than-human time: Jennifer Walshe’s Time Time Time (2019), Jem Finer’s Longplayer (1999), Felix Hess’ Air Pressure Fluctuations (2001) and John Luther Adams’s The Place Where You Go to Listen (2004-2006). Christenhusz aims to enquire how these works offer representations and sonifications of ecological notions of time through sound.

A Call to Recognize and to Imagine

A Call to Recognize and to Imagine

Discussing the way petrocapitalism frames current issues like air pollution and the Fukushima disaster, this text highlights the art of recognizing the state of the earth. Together with the arts (primarily literature, as Ghosh also suggests), the aim of this text is then to place a greater emphasis on imagining the earth otherwise, or, recognizing a different earth. This way we do not so much critique modernity, or the petrocapitalist forms of science, but rather, affirmatively, search for an alternative, a more inclusive and less human-centered way to deal with the crises of the contemporary.

In and Out of Time

In and Out of Time

The video diptych In and Out of Time portrays a calf that has just passed away. The image on the left shows a recording of the calf as seen with an ordinary video camera. The image on the right shows the same calf, as seen through an infrared camera. The videos are in synchrony: as the body of the calf cools down, its image slowly vanishes from the infrared image. The original recording time of 7 hours and 30 minutes is visible as a time code in lower right corner of the video.

Othering Time

Othering Time

In her article “Othering Time: Strategies of Attunement to Non-Human Temporalities”, Alice Smits delves into artistic practices that tune into deep time and non-human time zones. Starting from the view point that our current ecological crisis is in need of developing an ethics of care towards generations far into the future and life forms extremely different to ours, she discusses art and aesthetic knowledge as particularly well suited for experimentation with new stories and sensibilities about our place in time.